Tuesday Night Miracles

Awhile back, TW asked me to name some books about women’s journeys — where they go on a trip and find themselves or learn some lesson or bond with other women and I immediately said Kris Radish has written a lot of those books, hasn’t she? Which led me to see if she’s written any books we haven’t read (since we haven’t read any of her books in years, I figured it was likely) and whether any of her books were available in large print for TW’s mom because I wasn’t sure she’d read them…

Which is how Tuesday Night Miracles made it onto our shelf.

Typical Radish — women facing huge issues come together and get their lives together, mostly. It was a nice book to read in between some of the longer or more complex things on my shelf.

The Second Mrs. Hockaday

I wasn’t sure how I was going to feel about The Second Mrs. Hockaday since it was told through diary entries/letters AND it was set in a somewhat fictional South Carolina.

(When the author talks about Traveler’s Joy, I think Traveler’s Rest… when the author uses some real city names but not all real city names, there’s a confusion in my head that almost ruined the story for me. What was the point of the not real places? I don’t get that… I never understand why writers do this… whatever…)

Turns out I really liked it. The diary entries helped with a feeling of suspense, (though I was pretty sure I knew what happened from the first 20 pages, I didn’t know the details), and the writing was wonderful.

A Shade of Vampire

I stumbled into A Shade of Vampire because I was looking for another series written by this author and realized that there seems to be some sort of “cultish” following of this series so I thought, what the heck… while I’m waiting for the book I really want (that has four holds ahead of me) I’ll grab the first book in this vampire series and see what the fuss is.

The fuss is that it’s exactly the kind of vampire series a Twilight lover would enjoy. Meaning, I ENJOYED IT. I don’t care who rolls their eyes (TW) and judges me for it. I absolutely enjoyed it and I’d read another (though I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t read all 40+ books that may or may not be in this series.)

PS… it looks like this sucker is self-published, too? Or pay to publish? I don’t know but I’m fascinated by the following and the lack of a big name publisher. The power of the internet is at work here. It just is. (Yea, I’m going to go reserve the second book in the series, now. Judge away. I DON’T CARE! lol)

The Fireman

When will I learn not to start a Joe Hill chunkster on a weeknight? When? When?! Someone remind me of this, please.

The Fireman was exactly what you’d expect from a Joe Hill novel. Brilliant, just brilliant.

A pandemic… spontaneous combustion… global warming… fanaticism… all wrapped up in the feeling that this could actually be happening right now, under the current administration and our current social climate… and of course, I didn’t want to put it down.

(Martha Quinn…which only makes sense if you read the book but I just can’t say that enough. BRILLIANTLY DONE…)

Homegoing

I had no idea Homegoing would be so good. Seriously one of the best books I’ve read in forever.

Two half-sisters born in different villages in Ghana in the mid/late 1700s… the book follows their descendants and good lord it’s painful. Beautifully written, honest, and painful.

Read this and think about how the experiences of the first two women played a role in the lives of those who came later. Every single damn white person should read this.

Everfair

Well, that took forever and now that I’ve finished I can’t figure out why I didn’t quit Everfair (like TW did.)

It’s an alternate history afro-steampunk story (with a few lesbian/bi characters) which sounds like something I should really enjoy, right? That’s what I kept telling myself. And I did enjoy a line here and there or a page or two every now and then. I wanted to like it. I should have liked it but I really just didn’t.

Great idea. Great topic. Poorly executed.

Reading in May

Too much travel and not enough reading. It didn’t help that the audiobook I checked out was not holding my interest. Whatever. June should be SLIGHTLY better… probably.

Total: 5

2 non-fiction
1 YA
1 LGBTQ

Girl Mans Up

Girl Mans Up was excellent. Identity is complicated and Pen is FIERCE. I love her. (And everyone needs a brother (or a sister) like Johnny.)

I really think their photo project was brilliant, too. I wonder if there are any kids who’ve tried this…

Simple Rules

Beth Kanter mentioned the book Simple Rules and it sounded interesting so I checked it out of the library.

It is interesting but it’s a little dense and a little dry. Once I grokked the concept laid out in each chapter and mini-section of the chapter, I found myself skimming to see real life examples of the types of simple rules people (and animals/insects/etc) use. Those pieces were especially interesting.

I have spent a good bit of time thinking about bottlenecks and simple rules for them… I’m pretty sure I’ll be giving the process a try (or two) myself, very soon.

Lucky Boy

Ugh.

Lucky Boy, so depressing. SO depressing. Well written, good characters — so depressing.

Young woman, illegal immigrant gives birth to a baby — loves her baby, is doing a great job with him — gets picked up by police and then thrown into a detention center. She’s abused, she’s raped, she’s moved to another detention center, rinse and repeat. All she wants to do is get out and get her baby back.

Indian American couple in Berkley want a baby, can’t make/carry/deliver a baby and so… they foster. (Gah.)

Everyone loves the baby. Everyone wants what is best for him.

Painful story. Very painful.